With hopes that the weather is breaking, remember how unpredictable March can be

Editorial-Opinion-copy1-441x251

By Scott Bolthouse

Do you remember March 22, 2012?

The high temperature was 86 degrees that day. In fact, that whole month of March set records here in Michigan as the warmest spring in recent history. I clearly remember being outside and active with my family during that whole month; cleaning up the yard, working in the garden, and visiting the Metroparks. Huron Township truly shines when the weather is nice.

This morning, I took my first spring walk around the property I live on here in Huron Township. It was wet, muddy and cloudy, but it still felt great to get out and breathe some fresh air. I have high hopes that the weather here in Michigan is going to make a great change for the better.

We do have to keep in mind one thing though, as we long for the sun: March can send different types of weather patterns our way. According to Mark Torregrossa of M-Live, we can expect to experience a wide array of different types of weather as we make our way into April. While we hope for sun and 65 degrees, don’t be disappointed if we dip down into the high 20’s or 30’s a few more times this spring.

Check out a story I wrote for the Belleville Lake Current  back in February about the cause of this winter’s crazy weather

With nicer weather comes some problems. A side effect of warmer weather and increased precipitation, especially after a record setting winter, is massive melting. According to the United States Geological Survey current water data for Michigan, the streamflow in the southern-half of the state, including Wayne County, is way above normal. As ice packs move downstream, they can jam and cause rapid increases and decreases in the river or stream level, causing problems that can escalate quickly if you live near or around these tributaries.

As long as precipitation in the form of rain remains low, the flooding scare won’t be as predominant, especially since most of out snow-pack is now melted as of March 22. Regardless, keep an eye on those water-ways around the Township.

As the snow melts, a creek in Huron Township rises.

As the snow melts, a creek in Huron Township rises.

 

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