Category Archives: Opinion — Letters to the Editor

American Legion Post 231 updates community on recent rental hall upgrades, COVID restrictions

American Legion Post 231 in New Boston, MI


Posted Nov. 17, 2020

We at the American Legion Post 231 New Boston, MI. like other businesses and nonprofits have had our share of revenue reduction due to COVID-19 restrictions in 2020.

We have relied on the community along with corporate donations and fundraisers to raise revenue in the past. We admit we had to do some belt tightening this year and assess our annual budget, overhead and hall rental income/reductions.

We had to look at which regular rental contracts which would be renewed for 2021 and which ones would not. All this based on the latest State of Michigan COVID-19 restriction guidelines and the American Legion core value programs which we support.

While the American Legion supports the community it also supports its youth programs. We at the American Legion are guided by the four pillars of our foundation: National Security, Americanism, Veterans Affairs & Rehabilitation, and Children & Youth.

National security: The candidates need to know that The American Legion opposes illegal immigration and amnesty for illegal aliens, but fully supports opportunities for legal immigration.

Americanism: This organization promotes obedience to law and order, and respect for the U.S. Flag.

Veterans Affairs & Rehabilitation: Misusing substances such as alcohol, drugs, or tobacco can increase your risk for injuries, accidents, and physical and mental health problems. To change your substance use, you do not have to do it alone.

Children & youth: The American Legion builds enthusiasm for public service among young people through such programs as Boys Nation, Little league and the National Oratorical Contest.

It is these four pillars in which guide us when choosing where we put our manpower and resources. The membership has chosen to support the Junior Shooting Sports and has welcomed them to our post. We have already made a material investment in the program and then it was stalled when COVID-19 hit. In addition, we will support the Bellville High School Junior ROTC students and their program.

Community:
The American Legion has many well established community programs to include: Fire fighter of the year, or Law Officer of the year, Teacher of the year, Family Support Network, Veterans Homeless Task Force, Temporary Financial Assistance and Volunteering.
Some people like our seniors hate change while the younger generation of veterans welcome it. However, change is necessary in order to grow our post and achieve our recruiting and retention goals set by the American Legion Department of Michigan. This year our post has already achieved 108% renewal/retention rate due to the hard work of a few members who understand the department goals and incentives.

One, we now offer an American Legion Motorcycle Rider chapter. Two, we have grown the SAL (Son’s of the American Legion) Squadron membership. We keep recruiting new American Legion members to meet the needs of the next generation of veterans.

Family & Youth:
Baseball, Boys State, Junior Shooting Sports, Oratorical, Scholarships, Scouting, Student Trooper Youth Cadet Law Enforcement Program.

While the American Legion is making room for new programs at the Post 231, we have taken an interest in the “Junior Shooting Sports” air rifle program. One member has already made and investment in this program by procuring two air rifles for students to train with and learn the fundamentals of required safety. Two of our members are CPL (concealed permit license) certified instructors.

The Department of Michigan has scheduled a meeting/or phone call in regards to the junior shooting sports program November, 17, 2020 3:00pm. Here the program will be discussed at length with membership, questions and answers given, fundament training and membership background checks for team leaders discussed.

POST UPGRADES: 1. We have again partnered with the LOWE’s hero’s program and received 30 feet of new cabinets and counter tops. 2. We have added all new branches of the military photos on the walls. 3. We have painted the front of the building. 4. We have added a new American Legion Post 231 sign above the windows. 5. Improved the parking lot and made many outside improvements all by volunteers. See attachment! All these volunteer hours go on our annual CPR (Consolidated Post Report) to Washington DC.

Finally, we at AL231 plan to send one student each to both Boys State & Girls State in 2021.
In summary, we are sorry to have made so many operating changes to keep up with the changing times. While some may not accept these changes, it is for the better of the American Legion core values, our Post membership that we stay focused on our dedication our programs as it for the good of the order and our youth development.

For God and Country
Kind Regards,
Jim LaCasse
Commander
Bob Longlois
Adjutant
American Legion Post 231 734-238-2342

Article and photos submitted by Bob Longlois


 

Huron-Clinton Metroparks offering discounted rates on annual passes through new year

Willow Metropark seen on Sunday, Oct. 11, 2020. (Photo by Kyle Meeker/Meeker Photography)


Posted by The Huron Hub
Nov. 9, 2020

What’s the best time to get the 2021 Huron-Clinton Metroparks annual park pass? Right now. That’s because the parks system is providing a special discounted offer of just $35 for annual passes purchased by Dec. 31, 2020. That one pass can be used to access each of the 13 Metroparks across Southeast Michigan all year long.

Starting January 1, the 2021 Metroparks annual pass will cost $40 for residents ($29 for Seniors 62+) of the five counties served – Livingston, Macomb, Oakland, Washtenaw and Wayne – or $45 for non-residents ($34 for Seniors 62+). But now through the end of the year, everyone can purchase their 2021 pass for just $35, or $24 for Seniors 62 and older.

Additionally, any 2021 passes can be used immediately, even before the new year. That’s up to seven weeks of extra value with the same pass.

“Purchasing an annual pass is the best way to experience everything our diverse Metroparks have to offer,” said Amy McMillan, director of the Huron-Clinton Metroparks. “Plus, it’s a great value. Nothing else matches it in terms of what you get and how affordable it can be to get out and enjoy the great outdoors, which the COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced just how important that can be. It truly is an investment that keeps on giving all year long.”

McMillan also noted the new and improved online shopping experience, designed to offer a more streamlined customer experience. Those purchasing an annual pass online this year will be asked to create an account. They can then use that same login information when registering for programs, purchasing gift cards, reserving picnic shelters, and more.

Passes be purchased at www.metroparks.com/shop or at any Metroparks toll booth. The park offices remain closed to the public at this time until further notice.

The 13 Huron-Clinton Metroparks include Delhi, Dexter-Huron, Hudson Mills, Huron Meadows, Indian Springs, Kensington, Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, Lower Huron, Oakwoods, Stony Creek, Willow and Wolcott Mill Metroparks.

Article submitted by Huron-Clinton Metroparks 


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Message from Huron Township Clerk regarding weapons at polling locations

Huron Hub file photo

Posted Friday, Oct. 30, 2020

Message from Huron Township Clerk Jeremy Cady regarding weapons at polling locations:

Here are the rules/laws for Huron Township regarding firearms in polling locations.

No firearms in Precincts 1,3,4,5,& 6. They are either schools or places of worship, and those entities have “no weapon” policies on their properties.

Precinct number 2 will permit open carry or licensed concealed carry because THAT IS THE LAW. It is a Township (public) owned building.

Clerk Jeremy Cady

HOWEVER, it is the RESPONSIBILITY of the person carrying the firearm to know Michigan’s Firearm Law. DO NOT ARGUE WITH VOLUNTEER POLL WORKERS ON FIREARM LAWS. Call my office if you have a problem. 

Protect your own gun rights by being educated and not looking to make a point. Carry wisely, legally and safely. I support the 2nd Amendment wholeheartedly, but I also believe in personal responsibility. 

Police will be in each precinct. 

This is your community too…VOTE SAFE.

Jeremy R. Cady

Clerk
Huron Charter Township


Girl Scout troop builds and installs ‘little free library’ at local playground

Girl Scout Troop #75915


Posted by The Huron Hub
Oct. 23, 2020

Check out the new “Little Free Library” located in Huron Township by the playground at Willow Methodist Church Spread the word to Huron residents to take a book and share a book Thank you to Robert Lenz (grandfather to three of the girls) and Michelle Simon (mom and troop leader) for building it and Girl Scout Troop #75915 for painting and stocking it. Our troop is multi-level ages Kindergarten to 6th grade. We are so happy to be a part of such a fun project that the community can enjoy for years.

We wanted to do an outdoor activity that others could benefit from. Our girls will continue to keep the library stocked while also relying on others in the community to leave books too. We officially opened the library on Oct. 10, 2020.

We have registered our library with the Little Free Library Non-Profit Organization.

Article and photos submitted by Leslie Masciovecchio 


The Huron Hub needs your help to share the stories and happenings of Huron Township. 

Submit news, photos, announcements, events, articles for publication, and letters to the editor via email at Editor@HuronHub.com or at the contact page on HuronHub.com.


 

Want to know what’s happening in the Huron community? Watch the township board meetings online

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The township board meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Township Hall, 22950 Huron River Drive in New Boston. Photo by Scott Bolthouse — The Huron Hub.


Posted by Scott Bolthouse
The Huron Hub
Oct. 15, 2020

I don’t often write opinion pieces, because I see myself as a news writer who doesn’t really need to share my personal thoughts on topics, unless it is due.

In this case, it is due.

Being informed about what’s happening in the community is an important part of being a responsible citizen. Part of the reason why I launched The Huron Hub in March 2014 was to help keep residents informed about what’s going on in Huron Township.

People spend hours on the internet these days — it’s part of life in 2020.

How about spending roughly one hour, every two weeks, to watch a board meeting?

The unfortunate part of internet life is speculation and rumors, usually created in hastily made posts that are logged on local social media group pages, in comment sections, etc.

Rumors and speculation are never good. They are the catalyst for being misinformed, and they usually create strife among residents and elected officials.

If you want to know what’s going on in the Huron community, start by watching the township board and government meetings that are streamed online.

Even better: attend a meeting in person.

You have a chance during public comments to speak directly to the board members. This would be a perfect time to bring up issues that you feel are important. The board members might not always answer your concerns right on the spot, but it is the proper way to put your concern into the public record.

Sure, sometimes meetings are long, and aren’t filled with the most exciting stuff, but it’s part of a resident’s duty to watch what happens at these government meetings.

Most answers to basic questions are answered there.

In fact, the most recent meeting on Oct. 14 had a lot of good information in it for residents of this community. You can watch that meeting here.

All of Huron Township’s board meetings are streamed online. Visit this link to find out how to view the board meetings online.

The Township Board meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Township Hall, 22950 Huron River Drive in New Boston.


 

Letter to editor: Huron Education Association makes statement on fall return to school


Letter to the editor submitted Aug. 3, 2020

By Huron Education Association

As teachers, we want to be face to face with our students. We would LOVE to be able to go back to school, with a normal experience, if that were a possibility at this time. Unfortunately, so far, we do not know what school is going to look like in the fall, if we end up being physically back in the buildings. The one thing that we do know for sure is that it will look VERY different from a typical school day.

Many teachers have been approached by parents during the past few weeks about what school will look like in the fall. Parents want to make informed decisions, and many parents have told us that they feel that the information provided by the district was not specific enough or detailed enough to help them make the decision as to whether their child should go online or attend face to face.

A lot of parents have referenced the letter from the district, which says “It is clear that the majority of our parents and staff prefer some sort of face-to-face, in-person learning model.” Although it is true that our teachers all want to get back to normal, we did not have a majority of teachers who felt, based on the information provided by the district, that we could do it safely.

Many parents have questions about what the physical layout of classrooms will be in the coming year, how much time students would spend in each subject, how much students would be confined to their desks, and how much students will be allowed to interact with each other (group work, elementary stations, etc.).

For elementary students, what will recess look like, will they be able to have the group work, stations, and carpet time, or will they be asked to remain still and separated from one another?

For junior high and high school, how long will classes be, and how will passing time be managed, with students moving through the halls? What about vocational classes, which involve students not just moving between classes, but back and forth to other schools?

Just as we are all asked to socially distance in our everyday, adult interactions, students will be asked to maintain distance, in a way that they have not traditionally had to do.

Others have expressed concerns about the cleaning routines in the buildings, passing times, what lunch will look like, what bus runs will be like, and what will happen if a student has symptoms of COVID at any point during school.

If your child has special needs, how will those needs be met?

We suggest that you reach out to the district and school board for the information that has not yet been provided, so that you can make the best decision for your children. You have the right to specific details, in order to make the best decision for your children’s future.

If you have questions, we suggest asking direct, specific questions. The following contact information is directly from the Huron School District website:

Donovan Rowe, Superintendent:
Email: rowed@huronschools.org
Phone: (734) 782-2441 ext. 1120

Huron High School
Stephen Hudock, Principal
Email: hudocks@huronschools.org
Megan O’Brien, Assistant Principal
Email: obrienm@huronschools.org

Renton Jr. High School
Kurt Mrocko, Principal
Email: mrockok@huronschools.org
Jason Gomez, Assistant Principal
Email: gomezj@huronschools.org

Brown Elementary
Carrie Fisher, Principal
Email: fisherc@huronschools.org

Miller Elementary
Jean Gilbert, Principal
Email: gilbertj@huronschools.org

School Board
President: Jack Richert
Email: jackrichert@specialtree.com
Vice President: Trena Szawara
Email: szawarat@huronschools.org
Treasurer: Alice Whited
Email: whiteda@huronschools.org
Secretary: Scott Ferguson
Email: fergusons@huronschools.org
Trustee: Dana Town
Email: townd@huronschools.org
Trustee: Nathan Cornwall
Email: cornwalln@huronschools.org
Trustee: Cory Roupe
Email: roupec@huronschools.org


The Huron Hub accepts letters to the editor from all points of view. Submit your letter to ScottBolthouse@huronhub.com or through the contact page at HuronHub.com

Dreamstreet Realty opens in downtown New Boston

Dreamstreet Realty opened recently at 36974 Huron River Drive in downtown New Boston. Photo courtesy Brandy Sayger.


Posted Friday, June 12, 2020

Dreamstreet Realty is beyond excited about opening up in downtown New Boston!

We are a family brokerage that serves all of southeast Michigan. We come from five generations and a century of real estate experience and wisdom dating back to 1922.

It is our dream to continue the tradition of trust and excellence before us while continuing to grow and stay on the modern edge of real estate.

We would love to assist you when buying or selling your home. We make realty dreams a reality!

Brandy Sayger, Broker
Dreamstreet Realty

Dreamstreet Realty is located at 36974 Huron River Drive. You can contact their office at 734-606-5333.


 

Treasurer’s office makes adjustments due to COVID-19 pandemic

Huron Township Municipal Offices (Huron Hub file photo)


Posted by The Huron Hub | May 15, 2020 

Dear Residents,

Due to the Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe’” order, the Huron Township Treasurer’s Office has adjusted its practices in order to keep everyone safe.

The Township office still remains closed; however, the Treasurer’s office will have a staff member in on Tuesday’s and Friday’s from 8:30 am to 12:00 pm to answer any of your questions by phone. You may also leave a message (ext. 115) on the other days and someone will get back to you.

Cat and dog licenses are available by mailing a copy of your pet’s rabies vaccination along with a check for $10.00. The Township will mail you back a receipt and tag. You may also use the drop box next to the front door of the Township Hall. If you would like to wait until the Township is back open full time, the Township will waive the late fee.

Payments for water bills can be made by sending a check in the mail or by using the drop box next to front door. You may also pay on-line at the Township’s website. Click on “View Utility Billing Info” on the bottom left of the screen. Go to the “Utility Billing Payment” on the left. Enter information. Remember, there is a 3% convenience fee that will be added to your credit card.

Thank you for your patience,

Colleen Lazere
Township Treasurer


 

If you spot a fawn alone, don’t touch it, DNR says

It is not uncommon for deer to leave their young unattended so as not to draw attention to where it is hidden. Photo courtesy of Michigan Department of Natural Resources.


By: Michigan Department of Natural Resources 
Posted May 13, 2020

Fawns will start showing up in May and June. Remember, if you spot a fawn alone, do not touch it! There is a good chance it is supposed to be there. It is not uncommon for deer to leave their young unattended so as not to draw attention to where it is hidden. Young fawns have excellent camouflage and lay very still which makes it harder for predators to find them. The mother will return periodically to nurse her fawn when she feels it is safe.

The best thing you can do to help is leave the fawn alone and enjoy it from a distance. Leaving baby animals in the wild ensures they have the best chance for survival.

Remember, only licensed wildlife rehabilitators may possess abandoned or injured wildlife. Unless a person is licensed, it is unlawful to possess a live wild animal, including deer, in Michigan.

We all share the responsibility of keeping Michigan’s wildlife wild. Additional tips and information on what to do if you find a baby animal, are available at Michigan.gov/Wildlife.


 

Don’t delay calling 911 during a health emergency, EMS providers say

Image/Michigan Association of Ambulance Services


Posted Saturday, May 9, 2020

Michigan residents should not risk their lives in a health emergency by avoiding calling 911 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Michigan’s ambulance providers said recently.

The Michigan Association of Ambulance Services, and its member EMS agencies who serve 67 percent of Michigan counties, are seeing a troubling trend of people fearing to call 911 for heart attacks, strokes and other medical emergencies.

“We don’t want to see people develop a permanent medical disability or die needlessly due to fear of COVID or burdening the medical system,” said Jack Fisher, MAAS president and executive director of Medic 1 Ambulance in Berrien County. “Every minute counts in a medical emergency and people should still call for help, even during this pandemic.”

Michigan is not alone in this dangerous trend. Modern Healthcare reported that an American College of Emergency Physicians poll at the end of April found that 29 percent of those surveyed said they avoided medical care due to COVID-19 concerns. In another survey by Morning Consult, 75 percent of Americans surveyed said they avoided healthcare because they were concerned about stressing the system.

Michigan’s ambulance providers are prepared to safely care for patients with medical emergencies with protective gear and disinfecting protocols in place. EMS professionals are urging residents not jeopardize their health by avoiding calling for assistance.

“Individuals did not stop having heart attacks and strokes with the coronavirus appeared,” said Ron Slagell, president and CEO of Huron Valley Ambulance and past-president of MAAS. “While it’s important to take the pandemic seriously, signs of serious health problems should not be ignored or pushed off.”

The Michigan Association of Ambulance Services is a statewide trade association representing and advocating for ambulance services. Last year, MAAS members were responsible for more than 700,000 or 56 percent of ambulance transports in 2018. MAAS members also provide community paramedicine, ER diversion and 911.
services in several areas of Michigan.

For more information, visit miambulance.org.

Source: Michigan Association of Ambulance Services