Category Archives: State & Region

Metroparks seek public input on proposed grant projects at three parks

Photo courtesy Metroparks.com

Posted by The Huron Hub | Monday, Feb. 15, 2020

Metroparks intend to leverage grant funding to improve accessibility and recreation opportunities.

The Huron-Clinton Metropolitan Authority is seeking public input on three projects being submitted to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Recreation Grants program. The Metroparks are home to 13 parks in southeast Michigan and staff is looking to improve their impact on the community by leveraging grantfunding that will complement the Metroparks’ annual budget. The Metroparks are committed to removing barriers, creating and improving access, and increasing recreation opportunities for all, and if awarded, these grant funds will allow the parks to improve accessibility to water and trail recreation.

Public support and input help guide the final design of park improvements and result in stronger applications, so the Metroparks want to hear from the community.

One proposed project will be located at Delhi Metropark, located five miles outside of Ann Arbor. This park is home to 52acres of mature oak trees and open, grassy lawns along the Huron River. The proposed project would make improvements for accessibility along the Huron River by renovating the site to add a new floating dock system and an expanded sandy launch/take-out area using universal design principals, including: Expansion of sandy take-out area, new accessible floating kayak launch/take-out with solar edge lights, two accessible picnic tables and a bench with easy accessto the adjacent trails, dog waste station, relocation of water spigot for accessible use, improved concrete walkway to Huron River, native tree and other native vegetative buffer plantings.

The second proposed project would be located at Lake Erie Metropark. This 1,607-acre park is in the southeastern corner of Wayne County, at the junction of the Detroit River and Lake Erie. Lake Erie Metropark is part of the Downriver Linked Greenways North South Trail (part of the Iron Belle Trail) and the Detroit Heritage River Water Trail. The proposed project for Lake Erie Metropark would improve the Cherry Island NatureTrail and associated amenities for accessibility using universal design principles, including:

• Accessible concrete parking area with 3 van spaces• New 8’ wide aggregate trail from parking lot to new trailhead

• 6’ wide accessible aggregate path at Lake Erie viewing area• 2 accessible picnic tables, 2 bike hoops, and viewing scopes

• Removal and replacement of a land bridge trail with 10’ wide, 630’ long boardwalk

• New split rail fence for trail safety• Relocation of benches to accessible areas• Accessibility improvements to existing boardwalk

• Elevation and modification to existing trail for accessible slopes and cross-slopes• 5 native trees near parking lot

The third project is proposed for Stony Creek Metropark. This park extends across Oakland and Macomb counties with 4,435acres used for year-round recreation and education. The project at Stony Creek Metropark would improve accessibility of the Reflection Nature Trail and associated amenities using universal design principles, including:

• Replacement of three bridges• Replacement of the existing dock with shoreline viewing platform

• Accessible push button doors at the Nature Center main entrance

• Relocation of benches to accessible areas

• Various landscaping features including new native plantings and accessible prairie development

• Modification to existing trail for accessible slopes and cross-slopes

The public can review the projects, including conceptual plans,through the Metroparks website at http://www.metroparks.com/DNRgrants. Metroparks staff are offering multiple opportunities to provide feedback. Three virtual public meetings are scheduled, where each of the projects will be discussed along with opportunities for feedback. The zoom meetings are scheduled for:

• Thursday, February 18 from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

• Thursday, February 18 from 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

• Saturday, February 20 from 11 a.m. – Noon

Additionally, feedback can be given through an online survey if you are unable to attend one of the virtual events. Lastly, there will be a virtual public hearing on Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 9.a.m. prior to the Board of Commissioners meeting.

Project descriptions, renderings, Zoom meeting links, as well as links to the online surveys for each project can also be found online at http://www.metroparks.com/DNRgrants.


Winter storm warning issued for southeast Michigan through noon on Tuesday


Posted by The Huron Hub | Monday, Feb. 15, 2020 – 10:50 AM EST

A winter storm warning has been issued for southeast Michigan through Tuesday at noon.

5 to 9 inches of snow is forecasted for Monday night through Tuesday afternoon.

Here is the warning from the National Weather Service in Detroit:

Winter Storm Warning

for Wayne County

Issued by National Weather Service

Detroit, MI

10:10 AM EST Mon, Feb 15, 2021

…WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM THIS EVENING TO NOON EST TUESDAY…

* WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 5 to 9 inches.

* WHERE…St. Clair, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, Wayne, Lenawee and Monroe Counties.

* WHEN…From 6 PM this evening to noon EST Tuesday.

* IMPACTS…Travel could be very difficult. The hazardous conditions could impact the evening and especially the Tuesday morning commute.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Snow reintensifies toward 6 pm this evening. Snow becomes heavy at times tonight with an additional 6 to 9 inches expected before diminishing Tuesday morning. Highest snowfall totals expected from the Lake Huron shoreline southward through metro Detroit, Ann Arbor and near the Ohio border.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in your vehicle in case of an emergency.

Slow down and use caution while traveling


MDOT project will rebuild, repair 24 miles of I-275 from Will Carleton Road to 6 Mile Road


By Scott Bolthouse | THE HURON HUB
Posted Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021

MDOT announced today plans to repair and rebuild 24 miles of I-275 in Wayne County in six phases over three years.

MDOT will host a virtual meeting on Monday, Feb. 22 that details plans regarding a massive I-275 construction project that will span from Will Carleton Road to Six Mile Road.

The project includes ten miles of concrete pavement repairs, 14 miles of rebuilding concrete pavement, asphalt resurfacing of four interchanges, and rebuilding concrete pavement of parts or all of six interchanges.

MDOT said the project also includes improving 65 bridges and a retaining wall, drainage improvements, sign replacements, traffic signal modernizations, intelligent transportation system (ITS) improvements, sidewalk improvements that are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and tree replacements.

Additionally, a segment of the Metro Trail will be rebuilt to replace an adjacent retaining wall.

Public input is being sought to help MDOT “recognize and address any concerns that may result from the project,” a statement said.

You can submit public comments by March 9 using MDOT’s online comment form or by e-mailing MDOT Public Involvement Specialist and Hearings Officer Monica Monsma at MonsmaM@Michigan.gov.

The virtual meeting on Feb. 22 will be from 4 to 5:30 p.m.

Click here to join the Microsoft Teams Virtual Public Meeting

To join by phone without using Internet, call 248-509-0316, conference ID: 950 606 39#.

Copies of the meeting will be available from MDOT.


 

Man found dead on I-275 near Eureka Road on Tuesday night


Posted by The Huron Hub | Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021

A man was found dead Tuesday night on the shoulder of I-275 near Eureka Road, police said.

A vehicle was also found in the area.

Police are investigating the circumstance of the man’s death and whether the vehicle is related.

The southbound side of I-275 was shut down Tuesday night near Eureka Road. The area of freeway was reopened as of Wednesday morning.

The area of I-275 and Eureka Road (Google Maps)

Check back with The Huron Hub for updates.


State police: prepare for hazardous winter storm


Posted by The Huron Hub | Feb. 4, 2021

The Michigan State Police is encouraging residents and visitors to prepare for a winter
storm expected to affect all of Michigan today and Friday.

The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Storm Warning for much of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and a Winter Weather Advisory for all of the Lower Peninsula. The NWS is forecasting snow to arrive late this afternoon, creating slick roads and low visibility with conditions to worsen by Friday morning, as gusty winds, drifting snow and falling temperatures are added to the mix.

“Travel may be extremely dangerous during periods of heavy snowfall and gusting winds over the next two days,” said Capt. Kevin Sweeney, deputy state director of Emergency Management and commander of the Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division (MSP/EMHSD). “If planned travel is non- essential, you are encouraged to postpone it and stay home. Fewer vehicles on the roadways help snowplows clear roads more quickly and safely.”

To stay safe during a winter storm:
• Stay indoors if possible. If you must go outside, wear protective gear, such as hats, mittens, gloves, scarf and a warm coat.
• Avoid overexertion when shoveling heavy snow, pushing a car, or walking in deep snow. Take breaks frequently.
• Watch for signs of frostbite, which include loss of feeling or pale appearance of fingers, toes or face.
• Watch for signs of hypothermia, which include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, drowsiness and exhaustion.
• Understand the hazards of wind chill. As wind speed increases, heat is carried away from a person’s body more rapidly and could lead to severe hypothermia.
• Remove clothing if it gets damp or wet. Wet clothing can make you more prone to hypothermia.
• Check heating units. Poorly operating or damaged heating units can release carbon monoxide
gas. Test carbon monoxide detectors for proper operation and battery life.
• Check on family, friends and neighbors who are at risk and may need additional assistance.
• Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, keep a full tank of gas and an emergency preparedness kit
in your vehicle. Put warm clothing, such as gloves, blankets and hats, in your kit in case you become stranded. If you do become stranded or stuck, stay inside your vehicle and wait for help.

Motorists are encouraged to check travel conditions and weather reports before driving at http://www.michigan.gov/roadconditions. Major road closures can be found at http://www.michigan.gov/drive. The MSP/EMHSD asks that you tune into local news and/or view these websites rather than calling your local MSP post or 911 for travel conditions.

For more information on how to prepare before, during and after an emergency or disaster, visit http://www.michigan.gov/miready or follow MSP/EMHSD on Twitter at @MichEMHS.


Michigan allows contact sports to resume with COVID precautions in place


Posted by The Huron Hub | Feb. 4, 2021

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services updated its current epidemic order to allow contact sports to resume as of Monday, Feb. 8, provided masks are worn during practices and competition.

If masks cannot be worn, participants must be regularly tested for COVID-19 consistent with guidelines issued by MDHHS.

Officials say safety protocols like wearing masks and testing will help keep kids, coaches and families safe and allow schools to remain open for in-person instruction. The order remains in effect through Monday, March 29.

“We continue to make progress in reducing cases and hospitalizations, helping protect our families and frontline workers and saving lives. Now, starting February 8, contact sports can resume with safety measures in place,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. “Michigan continues to be a national leader in fighting this virus, and we must continue using a fact-based approach so we can return to a strong economy and normal day-to-day activities. One of the most important things Michiganders can do is to make a plan to get the safe and effective vaccine when it’s available to
you. And as always, mask up and maintain six feet of social distancing. We all have a personal responsibility to slow the spread of the virus so we can end this pandemic together.”

“We are pleased at our continued progress in Michigan that has allowed us to take this step forward in a phased approach,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health at MDHHS. “As a parent and former student-athlete myself, I get how important athletics are to our children’s physical and mental health. However, parents and athletes need to understand the risk involved with contact sports if they choose to participate. Sports that require frequent closeness between players make it more difficult to prevent disease transmission even when mitigation measures are in place, including masks. Even when not required, we urge teams to implement a testing program to protect athletes, coaches and their families.”

MDHHS had been closely monitoring three metrics for stabilization or declines over the past several weeks, and Michigan continues to see improvements . In recent days:
• Hospital capacity dedicated to COVID-19 patients has been in 10-week decline, with current capacity at 6.6% for beds with COVID-19 patients. Peaked at 19.6% on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
• Overall case rates: Currently at 159 cases per million after peaking at 740 cases per million on Saturday, Nov. 14. Rate has been in solid decline for 24 days. Three MERC regions in the state are now below 150 cases per million people: the Detroit, Traverse City and Upper Peninsula regions.
• Positivity rate: currently at 4.9% and declining. This is the first time positivity has been this low since mid-October

Contact sports are allowed as long as participants are masked during play or practice. For sports where masks cannot be worn and social distancing cannot be maintained all participants must be tested consistent with the program specified in the Testing and Additional Mitigation Measures for Athletic Practice and Play section of MDHHS’s Interim Guidance for Athletics which will be available online at Michigan.gov/coronavirus on Sunday, Feb. 7.
Sports organizers are encouraged to administer a testing program even if it is not required.

Participants need to maintain six feet of distance when not actively engaged in play and wear face masks at all times. Spectators are allowed with up to 250 people in stadiums that seat less than 10,000 and up 500 people at venues that seat over 10,000 people.

Indoor residential and non-residential gatherings are limited to 10 people and two households. MDHHS continues to urge families to avoid indoor gatherings or to pick a single other household to interact with consistent with guidance already released by the department. Families are encouraged to stay home as much as possible to maintain momentum and to protect loved ones. Families are also encouraged to Mask Up, Mask Right, using guidance for what masks to wear and how to wear them.

The epidemic order continues to temporarily pause other venues and activities where participants have close physical contacts and are not consistently masked, like water parks.

As before, employees who work in jobs that cannot be performed from home can continue to go to work, while employees who can work from home should continue to do so.

The latest information is available at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus and CDC.gov/Coronavirus. To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine, visit Michigan.gov/COVIDVaccine.


New Michigan scholarship offers tuition-free opportunity for residents age 25+ to earn associate degree, skills certificate

Posted by The Huron Hub| Feb. 2, 2021

Michigan announced today the launch of a $30 million ‘Michigan Reconnect’ program, the largest effort in state history to ensure that more than 4.1 million Michiganders who are 25 or older and do not have a college degree will have an opportunity to earn a tuition-free associate degree or skills certificate. 

Michigan Reconnect will pay the cost of tuition for eligible adults who want to pursue an associate degree or skills certificate at their in-district community college. The program also offers skills scholarships to help cover the cost of tuition through more than 70 private training schools with 120 programs that offer certificates in high-demand careers in industries such as manufacturing, construction, information technology, healthcare or business management. 

Starting today, Michiganders can submit applications at Michigan.gov/Reconnect. The application takes less than five minutes to complete and can be done on a mobile
Reconnect scholarships are accepted by all Michigan community colleges and are even available to eligible adults who are already enrolled in their local community college. The program pays the remaining balance of tuition and mandatory fees after other state and federal financial aid have been applied. For those who choose to attend an out-of-district community college, Reconnect will pay the in-district portion of tuition.

The Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO) is administering Reconnect in partnership with the Michigan Department of Treasury.

“Reconnect offers a path for so many Michiganders hoping to begin – or complete – their education and career journey,” said LEO Acting Director Susan Corbin. “This program, like so many others we’re focused on, will help expand opportunity for all Michiganders and make Michigan a better place to live, work and play.”

To be eligible for Michigan Reconnect, you must:
-Be at least 25 years old when you apply
-Have lived in Michigan for a year or more
Have a high school diploma
-Have not yet completed a college degree (associate or bachelor’s)

Funding for Michigan Reconnect was introduced in Gov. Whitmer’s FY 2020-21 budget proposal. A bipartisan group of legislators – led by state Sen. Ken Horn, R-Frankenmuth, state Sen. Jim Ananich, D-Flint, state Rep. Ben Frederick, R-Owosso, state Rep. Sarah Anthony, D-Lansing, and former state Rep. Sheryl Kennedy, D-Davison – approved $30 million in state funding.

Michigan employers’ ability to find highly skilled and capable employees is more difficult than ever and is cited as a top concern in the most recent Michigan Future Business Index Report. Michigan Reconnect will help address the dual challenges of the state’s widening talent gap and aging workforce.

As of 2019, only 41% of Michigan’s working-age residents had an associate degree or higher, placing Michigan at 31st in the nation. The average age of Michigan’s 365,232 residents currently enrolled at a community college is 25.7 years old, and more than 36% are 25 or older, according to the Michigan Community College Association.

Several organizations from all sectors of the state’s economy have pledged to work as Reconnect Champions to promote awareness of the program, including the Michigan Manufacturers Association.

Individuals looking to take advantage of Reconnect who are unsure what they’d like to study are encouraged to consider some of Michigan’s high-demand careers. A list of those careers and wages by occupation and region is available on the Michigan Reconnect website.

Shabaka Bailey, 25, of Lansing, spoke at today’s virtual news conference and described Michigan Reconnect as an “almost too good to be true” opportunity.

Bailey learned about the program through a career coach at the Capital Area Michigan Works agency in Lansing. He is currently looking for work after receiving lay-offs last summer from a lumber yard and a local restaurant that closed due to the coronavirus.

“It’s hard right now with the pandemic,” said Bailey, who is the father of a 5-year-old son, Josiah, and 1-year-old daughter, Journi.

“I had thought about going to Lansing Community College to get my associate degree,” he said. “But I couldn’t afford to pay the cost of tuition and still support my kids at the same time. Michigan Reconnect is a great opportunity for me to pursue my dream now.

“I plan to enroll at LCC and begin their aviation program,” Bailey added. “I want to become an aviation technician and work on plane engines. I think that’s a good career for me that will allow me to make something of myself.”

A virtual news conference tour through March will also introduce Michigan Reconnect benefits to audiences across the state. The events will feature state legislators and local leaders representing community colleges and business and workforce development organizations, as well as testimonials from prospective Michigan Reconnect applicants from every region of the state.

While more than 8 in 10 parents of a Michigan high school student expect their child to earn a college degree, 70% said that high costs are a barrier, according to a survey commissioned by the Michigan Association of State Universities.

Michigan Reconnect is an ideal solution for those families and students who initially decided they couldn’t afford to pay tuition to attend community college or feared taking on student loan debt.

The program builds on the success of the Futures for Frontliners initiative Gov. Whitmer launched last September and to which more than 120,000 Michiganders submitted applications by the Dec. 31 deadline.

The nation’s first program of its kind, Futures for Frontliners offered tuition-free college or high school completion to Michiganders who provided essential front-line services during COVID-19 Stay Home, Stay Safe orders between April and June 2020.

Approximately 20,000 Michiganders who applied but didn’t qualify for Futures for Frontliners and are 25 years or older will automatically be eligible for tuition-free college assistance with Michigan Reconnect.

Eligible residents can learn more and apply for Michigan Reconnect at michigan.gov/Reconnect.


Indoor dining can reopen in Michigan on Monday

Posted by The Huron Hub | Monday, Feb. 1, 2021

After being closed down for indoor service for nearly three months, restaurants can once again open their doors to customers for indoor dining starting today.

Restaurants will have to abide by strict rules to help stop the spread of COVID.

Those rules include ensuring tables are six feet apart, and to operate at 25 percent capacity, and a limit of 100 people allowed inside.

Only six people will be allowed at each table under the new rules.

Restaurants will also have to close by 10 p.m.

Will you visit restaurants now that they are open for in-person dining?

Let us know in the comments section of this article.


Indoor dining in Michigan reopens Feb. 1


The Huron Hub | Posted Friday, Jan. 22, 2020Michigan COVID update

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services released an order today reopening indoor dining begenning Monday, Feb. 1.

The order will allow for indoor dining at restaurants with certain requirements; concessions at casinos, movie theaters and stadiums; personal services requiring mask removal; and non-residential gatherings of up to 10 people from two households.

The new order will last three weeks, until Sunday, Feb. 21.

“The pause has worked. The efforts we have made together to protect our families, frontline workers and hospitals have dramatically reduced cases and we have saved lives. Now, we are confident that starting February 1, restaurants can resume indoor dining with safety measures in place,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. “Michigan continues to be a national leader in fighting this virus, and we must continue working to keep it that way. One of the most important things Michiganders can do is to make a plan to get the safe and effective vaccine when it’s available to you. And as always, mask up and maintain six feet of social distancing. We will end this pandemic together.”

“We are pleased to see the improvements in case rates, hospitalizations and percent positivity that have allowed us to reopen more activities,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health at MDHHS. “However, we must remain vigilant, especially since we now have a new more easily transmitted variant of this virus present in our state. This is not the time to let our guard down and Michiganders should minimize their risk by avoiding gatherings, wearing masks properly, social distancing and making a plan to get their vaccine when it is their turn.”

MDHHS says it has been closely monitoring three metrics for stabilization or declines over the past several weeks.

Michigan continues to see improvements in these metrics which has allowed for additional relaxing of protocols and reopening of activities. In recent days:

• Hospital capacity dedicated to COVID-19 patients has been in seven-week decline, with current capacity at 9.9% for beds with COVID-19 patients. Peaked at 19.6% on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
• Overall case rates: Currently at 225 cases per million. Peaked at 740 cases per million on Saturday, Nov. 14, plateaued after a decline to 239 on Friday, Dec. 25 and has been in decline for 11 days.
• Positivity rate: currently at 6.8% and declining.

Restaurants and bars will be allowed to reopen at 25% capacity with up to 100 people.

Tables must be six feet apart with no more than six people per table. Outdoor tents with four sides are permitted under these same rules.

Bars and restaurants must close by 10 p.m., and contact information must be collected from diners for contact tracing purposes.

“Today’s announcement is possible because of our progress over the last two months,” said Robert Gordon, MDHHS director. “Even so, the science is clear that unmasked, indoor activities like dining and drinking are still a source of high risk around COVID-19. The safest course remains to support your favorite restaurant with carryout, delivery or outdoor dining. If individuals choose to eat out, there are two things they can do to make it much safer: go out only with members of their own household and choose a restaurant participating in the MI COVID-19 Safer Dining certification program.”

The voluntary MI COVID-19 Safer Dining program allows food service establishments to become certified by having their ventilation system inspected and submitting their inspection report to the state indicating they are optimizing airflow. Once certified, businesses will be featured on the Michigan.gov/covidsaferdining website and receive a copy of their certification to post at their establishment to alert diners of their participation.

Funding is proposed for food service establishments to participate as part of the $10 million included in the recent supplemental budget request for restaurant supports administered by the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Two webinars will be hosted on Monday, Jan. 25 to provide additional information about the Safer Dining certification program – one at noon for HVAC contractors interested in conducting inspections and one at 3 p.m. for food service establishments interested in becoming certified. More information will be available at Michigan.gov/covidsaferdining.

Indoor residential and non-residential gatherings are limited to 10 people and two households. MDHHS continues to urge families to avoid indoor gatherings or to pick a single other household to interact with consistent with guidance already released by the department.

Families are encouraged to stay home as much as possible to maintain momentum and to protect loved ones, and are also encoured to wear masks in public.


MDOT is naming snowplows, and everyone can help

A Wayne County snow plow clears the downtown New Boston area during a recent snow. (Photo by Scott Bolthouse—The Huron Hub)

Posted by The Huron Hub — Jan. 18, 2020

Michigan Department of Transportation snowplows will have a special and personal touch on the department’s interactive Mi Drive map.

Inspired in part by TrafficScotland.org, MDOT has started giving snowplows unique and creative names on the Mi Drive map.

Current names include Plowasaurus Rex, Sir Salts-A-Lot, and Snowboni, and were chosen from hundreds of public offerings.

Yes, Plowy McPlowface is on the list.

Among the submissions were three special names: Tiger, Chill Bill, and Frosty, all from Roxane Gilbert’s 5th Grade students at Fair Plain East Elementary in Benton Harbor. Tiger, the school’s mascot, is now the name of one of the plows along M-63 near the school.

“We are excited that these snowplows will reflect our students’ creativity,” Fair Plain East Principal Brian Litten said. “Going forward, this partnership with MDOT will open the doors for our students to recognize career opportunities.”

To see each snowplow’s name, visit Mi Drive at http://www.Michigan.gov/Drive and activate the MDOT snowplow tracker map layer. By hovering over an icon, the plow name will appear. Clicking on the icon will show the name and a description of what the truck is doing, as well a driver’s seat view of current road conditions through the snowplow cameras.

Starting with several snowplows in MDOT’s Southwest Region, MDOT is hopeful to name each of the more than 250 MDOT plows statewide in the near future.

“This idea really was driven by people who reached out to us and wanted to know how they could name our plows like those in other places,” Nick Schirripa, MDOT spokesman, said. “There was so much positive energy and excitement generated so quickly for this idea, it was contagious. We couldn’t help but give the idea some legs and get some fantastic ideas for names.”

To see each snowplow’s name, visit Mi Drive at http://www.Michigan.gov/Drive and activate the MDOT snowplow tracker map layer. By hovering over an icon, the plow name will appear. Clicking on the icon will show the name and a description of what the truck is doing, as well a driver’s seat view of current road conditions through the snowplow cameras.

“We hoped this could be both fun and instructive and we’re thrilled with the participation from students and others in the community,” said MDOT Director Paul C. Ajegba. “I love many of the suggestions, and I can’t wait to see more.”

School and community groups are encouraged to submit ideas as an organization, in essence adopting a snowplow as their own and creating opportunities to learn more about snowplowing operations, winter driving, and other transportation-related safety topics.

More names are needed, and everyone is welcomed to participate. Go to http://www.Michigan.gov/NameMISnowplow and submit your ideas. There are a few guidelines. To be considered, suggestions must be G-rated and family friendly, and submissions that include famous, character, or brand names cannot be used. Staff from each of MDOT’s seven regions will be able to select their own plow names from the list.