Category Archives: Schools

Huron Rotary donation allows Huron School District to purchase 22 hand sanitizer stations

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Posted by The Huron Hub | July 28, 2020

The Huron Township Rotary Club donated funding to the Huron School Board allowing the district to purchase 22 hand sanitizer stations needed for school buildings.

Melanie Shepler, president of the Rotary, presented the donation to the board recently.

Superintendent posts update on 2020-2021 school year


Posted July 24, 2020 | The Huron Hub 

The superintendent of Huron Schools posted an update regarding the 2020-2021 school year.

Here is the letter posted July 24, 2020:

Click the letter to read the entire communication

You can read past announcements from the district at this link.


 

Whitmer releases roadmap for schools to reopen in the fall


Posted June 30, 2020 | The Huron Hub

Today, Governor Whitmer released the MI Safe Schools Return to School Roadmap, a document to help districts create local plans for in-person learning in the fall.

“The Roadmap outlines a number of safety protocols for schools to implement in each phase of the governor’s MI Safe Start Plan,” a statement from Whitmer said.

Whitmer also signed Executive Order 2020-142, which provides a structure to support all schools in Michigan as they plan for a return of PreK-12 education in the fall.

“Our students, parents, and educators have made incredible sacrifices during our battle with COVID-19,” Whitmer said. “Thanks to our aggressive action against this virus, the teachers who have found creative ways to reach their students, and the heroes on the front lines, I am optimistic that we will return to in-person learning in the fall. The MI SafeSchools Return to School Roadmap will help provide schools with the  guidance they need as they enact strict safety measures to continue protecting educators, students, and their families. I will continue working closely with the Return to Learn Advisory Council and experts in epidemiology and public health to ensure we get this right, but we also need more flexibility and financial support from the federal government. This crisis has had serious implications on our budget, and we need federal support if we’re going to get this right for our kids.”

“The most important thing we can do as we prepare to reopen school buildings in the fall is closely examine the data and remain vigilant in our steps to fight this virus,” said MDHHS Chief Deputy for Health and Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun. “I will continue to work closely with Governor Whitmer and the Return to Learn Advisory Council to ensure we continue to put the health and safety of our students and educators first. We will remain nimble to protect students, educators, and their families.” 

Executive Order 2020-142 requires school districts to adopt a COVID-19 Preparedness and Response Plan laying out how they will protect students and educators across the various phases of the Michigan Safe Start Plan.

The roadmap sets guidelines as to the types of safety protocols that will be required or recommended at each phase.

Whitmer also announced that she was allocating $256 million to support the districts in implementing their local plans as part of the bipartisan budget agreement the Senate Majority Leader, the Speaker of the House, and the governor announced yesterday.

The safety protocols detailed in the MI Safe Schools Roadmap includes guidance on  the use of PPE, good hygiene, cleaning/disinfecting, spacing in classrooms, screening for symptoms, athletics, and more. The Roadmap also recognizes the impact COVID-19 has had on students’and educators’ metal health, and offers guidance on how schools can address this issue. 

Whitmer said she will continue to use the MI Safe Start Plan as the highest-level governing framework for determining if and when it is safe to resume in-person instruction.  

To view MI Safe Schools Roadmap, click here. 

To view Executive Order 2020-142, click this link.

Photos: Huron High School 2020 graduation day

Congratulations to Huron High School’s class of 2020. (Reader submitted photo)


Posted by Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub| June 30, 2020

Huron High School in New Boston held graduation ceremonies for 2020 seniors on June 27, 2020.

Families of the graduating seniors shared photos with The Huron Hub to commemorate their special day.

Thank you to all of the families who shared photos.

Here they are:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


 

Senior graduation parade set for Friday in New Boston

(Photo by Scott Bolthouse– The Huron Hub)


Posted Thursday, June 25, 2020

Huron High School senior graduation parade through New Boston set for Friday evening.

See the attached flyer below for full info.

Huron Public Safety will be escorting the parade.

For the safety of students, Huron River Drive will be closed from Willow to the Renton Middle School Entrance beginning at 11:30 a.m.

Access to the Michigan Memorial Cemetery will still be open using either the Huron River Drive/Merriman gate and/or access to the main gate via Willow Road.

Funeral services will be diverted to enter the cemetery through the Funeral Home Entrance.

“First, I want to congratulate the graduating Senior Class. They have lost so many experiences due to this pandemic and we are honored to be a small part of anything that can be done to make this a special and memorable time for them. We realize that these events could cause traffic issues but hope that the community will be patient so that we can help provide a safe atmosphere for the students and their proud families,” said Everette Robbins, public safetey director.

“We will have fire and police staffing at the blocked areas to assist residents with concerns and questions. Also, a big thank you to the staff at the Michigan Memorial Cemetery for their sacrifice and help in making this happen. We appreciate their community partnership. They asked that I pass on their congratulations to the Class of 2020.”​​


Schools face $1 billion in new costs before safely reopening in the fall, says Tri-County Alliance


Posted by The Huron Hub | June 24, 2020

The Tri-County Alliance for Public Education (TCA) shared cost projections and considerations with Governor Whitmer and legislative leaders that outline requirements and regulations schools will likely need to adhere to in order to reopen safely in the fall. The expected requirements, based on preliminary guidance from federal and local health departments, will add more than $1 billion in new costs for school districts statewide for the upcoming school year. Without additional support, this equates to $665 per-pupil that would be diverted from students’ education.

“We are hearing loud and clear from parents that they want their kids back in the classrooms this fall, and that they will, understandably, demand schools meet or exceed health and safety guidelines in order to do so,” said Mark Greathead, Superintendent of Woodhaven-Brownstown Schools and TCA President. “Schools, as it stands, are not prepared to take on new costs related to COVID-19 and are in critical need of immediate funding from the state and federal government.”

In order to implement safe reopening plans while adhering to guidelines from the CDC, state and local health departments, TCA estimates schools must plan to take on the following additional health and safety costs:

  • Personal Protective Equipment
    • Masks: Recommend two per day for every student and staff
      • $14 million – $17 million per month for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb
      • $35 million – $47 million per month statewide
    • Gloves: Recommend 100 disposable gloves available daily per school
      • $4 million – $8 million per month statewide
    • Thermometers:
      • $2.2 million for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb
      • $6.3 million statewide
    • Cleaning and Sanitization Supplies:
      • $9 million per month for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb
      • $25 million statewide
  • Online Connectivity: Equity periods of remote learning means ensuring students are on a level playing field by providing every student with a device on connectivity to keep on pace with peers
    • $125 million – $200 million statewide
  • Continued food distribution if students are not in school all day, every day
    • $24.5 million for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb
    • $67.8 million statewide

Beyond resources and funding, TCA urged the Governor and legislative leaders to allow for flexibility in operations. The student evaluations, requirements and regulations schools traditionally adhere to—such as the third grade reading law, teacher evaluations and how per-pupil counts will be determined—will  likely not reflect how schools will deliver services this upcoming year and will, more than likely, take time and resources away from schools when they are already struggling to meet requirements and costs related to COVID-19. Yesterday, Georgia became the first state to seek federal approval from the U.S. Education Department to waive standardize testing for the 2020-2021 school year. TCA encourages Michigan’s Governor and legislative leaders to make that same request.

“It is our recommendation that certain student and teacher evaluations and related requirements for the upcoming year be suspended or waived in order for schools to focus their efforts on serving students in the manner that best fits the needs of their local communities,” Greathead said. “We also continue to call on Congress to provide additional stimulus dollars and greater flexibility in the funds already provided.”

View the full list of considerations and cost projections for fall 2020 here.

The Tri-County Alliance for Public Education is a coalition of education leaders “committed to fighting for strong K-12 schools across Michigan,” according to the alliance. Comprised of Superintendents from every district in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, they are collectively responsible for educating over 500,000 students.

Article source: The Tri-County Alliance for Public Education


 

Free Press: Huron High School alumni asking district to stop using Native American mascot

Huron High School seen on May 17, 2020 (Huron Hub photo)


Posted by Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub| June 22, 2020

A group of Huron High School alumni is asking the Huron School District to stop using Native American imagery as its mascot, according to a Detroit Free Press report published Monday.

The report by the Free Press says the former students wrote a letter to Superintendent Donovan Rowe recently asking that the district “denounce the use of Native American stereotypes and imagery in all Huron School District capacities,” according to the Free Press report.

Rowe acknowledged the group and responded with a statement.

Read the superintendent’s response in the entire report in The Detroit Free Press 

Some of the alumni organizing the cause gathered in front of the high school last Friday wearing face masks in photos published by the Free Press.

The organizers said they planned to attend Monday’s school board meeting.

Huron Hub readers — what are your thoughts? Should mascot branding like what’s used in Huron Schools be renamed? Share your responses on our Facebook and Twitter pages.


 

Whitmer announces steps for school reopening in the fall

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Posted by Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub| June 17, 2020

Governor Whitmer announced Wednesday that Michigan schools may resume in-person learning in phase 4 of the MI Safe Start plan.

Schools in the state will have to follow strict safety measures for in-person learning.

A statement from Whitmer also announced that on June 30, she will release an executive order and document called “Michigan’s Return to School Roadmap” that will provide details on what will be required and what will be recommended for schools.

Whitmer said the need for support and flexibility from the federal government will help ensure resources for students and educators.

“Our students and educators have made incredible sacrifices these past few months to protect themselves and their families from the spread of COVID-19,” Whitmer said. “Thanks to our aggressive action against this virus, those who have done their part to flatten the curve, and the heroes on the front lines, I am optimistic that we will return to in-person learning in the fall. Schools must make sure to enact strict safety measures to continue protecting educators, students, and their families. I will continue working closely with the Return to Learn Advisory Council and leaders in health care to ensure we get this right, but we also need more flexibility and support from the federal government. This crisis has had serious implications on our budget, and we need federal support if we’re going to get this right for our kids.”

The Return to School plan will align closely with the MI Safe Start Plan, she said.

Whitmer said districts, students, staff, and families must be nimble and be prepared to move backwards if there is evidence of community spread of the virus.

“The most important thing we can do when developing a return to school plan is closely examine the data and remain vigilant in our steps to fight this virus,” said MDHHS Chief Deputy for Health and Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun. “I will continue to work closely with Governor Whitmer and the Return to Learn Advisory Council to ensure we continue to put the health and safety of our students and educators first. This is a big step, and we will remain flexible to protect everyone who steps foot in a Michigan school.”

The Roadmap will set the minimum health and safety requirements, although districts may choose to enact more aggressive ones in consultation with local public health officials.

These minimum requirements will apply to all schools, including traditional public, charter, private, and parochial schools.

On May 15, Whitmer signed Executive Order No. 2020-88 creating the COVID-19 Return to School Advisory Council.

“The Advisory Council was created to identify the critical issues that must be addressed, provide valuable input to inform the process of returning to school, and to ensure a smooth and safe transition back to school. The Council will act in an advisory capacity to the Governor and the COVID-19 Task Force on Education, and will develop and submit recommendations to the COVID-19 Task Force on Education regarding the safe, equitable, and efficient K-12 return to school in the Fall,” a statement from Whitmer said.

Related: Here is an end of school year update from Huron School District superintendent 


 

Display honors Huron High School class of 2020

The front lawn of Huron High School in New Boston was transformed into a tribute featuring a wall of photos to honor this year’s graduates. (Photos by Scott Bolthouse — The Huron Hub)


By Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub
ScottBolthouse@HuronHub.com

Posted May 17, 2020

The staff at Huron High School in New Boston are making sure this year’s graduating class does not go unnoticed.

The class of 2020 will begin their final week of school on Monday as the country continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic.

To honor this year’s graduating class, staff at the high school placed a wall of photos on the school’s front lawn featuring each senior.

Principal Steven Hudock said in a social media post that the tribute will be up for about two weeks before the lawn signs are disturbed to families.

Grads and the community are welcome to stop by and check out the tribute.

“HHS Class of 2020, congrats on your last week! This is a tribute to all of you! Feel free to drive by and take pictures. Please practice social distancing. I’d like to leave these up for 2 weeks,” Hudock said.

Photos: Huron High School honors 2020 graduates 
Photos by Scott Bolthouse — The Huron Hub


 

Whitmer announces process for reopening schools in fall, launches Return to Learning Advisory Council


Posted by The Huron Hub | May 15, 2020 

Gov. Whitmer today announced the Return to Learning Advisory Council through Executive Order 2020-88, formalizing a process for determining how schools may be able to reopen in the fall.

The panel–comprised of students, parents, frontline educators, administrators and public health officials–will provide the COVID-19 Task Force on Education with recommendations on how to safely, equitably, and efficiently return to school in the Fall.

The State of Michigan will also partner with a national nonprofit organization called Opportunity Labs to bring national expertise to this project.

“It’s critical we bring together experts in health care and education, as well as students, educators, and families to think about how and if it’s possible to safely return to in-person learning in the fall and how to ensure the more than 1.5 million K-12 students across Michigan get the education they need and deserve,” Whitmer said said. “This panel will use a data-informed and science-based approach with input from epidemiologists to determine if, when, and how students can return to school this fall and what that will look like.”

On March 3, Whitmer established the COVID-19 Task Force on Education which includes key state government agencies, including representatives from MDHHS, MDE, and others.

“Since then, she has worked around the clock with experts in health care and education to protect our students, educators, and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic,” a statement from the governor’s office said.

Whitmer closed school buildings to students on March 16, and announced on April 30 that buildings would remain closed for the duration of the school year.

The original task force will recommend a roadmap and framework for school to utilize to plan for various public health scenarios.

“Going forward, the Task Force will be informed by the Return to School Advisory Council, including voices from educators, health experts, and other community stakeholders. The Advisory Council will gather critical stakeholder feedback on the content of the Roadmap,” a statement from Whitmer said.

Whitmer says schools must consider the following key issues before opening:

  • Performing outreach to ensure the voices of stakeholders are included in the discussion of implementing the 2020-2021 school year in these challenging and uncharted circumstances.
  • Ensuring experts in public health and epidemiology are informing the discussion of safety returning to school.
  • Recommending actions to remove statutory/administrative barriers to delivering education before we are at Phase 6 of the MI Safe Start Plan.
  • Recommending actions to develop and improve systems for remedial support for students who experienced learning loss during the spring and summer.

“I want to thank all of the parents who have been burning the candle at both ends these last few months trying to help their kids stay on track with their schoolwork while juggling their other responsibilities during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. I know it hasn’t been easy,” Whitmer said. “My hope is that by organizing a formal process informed by public health experts, we can give school districts much-needed direction heading into the 2020-2021 school year.”

Dr. Mario Ramirez, managing director of Opportunity Labs, is a practicing emergency physician and former acting director of pandemic and emerging threats for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the ebola epidemic.

“We look forward to supporting the Advisory Council in its work to ensure the safest possible return to school in the fall,” Ramirez said.

Support for the project is being provided but the Council of Michigan Foundations, the C.S. Mott Foundation, and other philanthropic organizations.

Anyone interested in the Return to Learn Advisory Council can apply by going to Michigan.gov/appointments and click ‘apply now’ under boards and commissions.

The panel will be made up of more than 20 members representing K-12 administrators and educators, health experts and community stakeholders.

You will be able to choose Return to School Advisory Council under the appointment information tab within the application.

Applications are due by Wednesday, May 20.