Category Archives: Other News

Expect traffic backups on Middle Belt Road during resurfacing project


By Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub
ScottBolthouse@HuronHub.com
Posted June 13, 2019 — 11:00 a.m. EST

Expect closures and traffic backups on Middle Belt Road in Huron Township beginning Friday.

A resurfacing project will begin on Middle Belt Road between King and Sibley Friday morning.

The two-day project will begin Friday, June 14, and will last from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. The road will then re-open to traffic through the weekend and work will continue Monday, June 17, from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. (weather permitting).

Expect traffic delays on south and northbound Middle Belt Road.

Access to all businesses and residences will be held during paving within the location of that specified drive approach until the asphalt dries.

Cars will be instructed where to park or which detour routes to access businesses and residences until after project completion.

Please use caution when driving through work zones and follow the directions of the crew on site.

For more information contact the 24-hour customer service center at 1-888-ROAD-CREW for visit waynecounty.com.


 

Advertisements

Detroit Metro Airport’s North Terminal welcomes three new restaurants

Three restaurants recently opened for business in Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport’s North Terminal. The restaurants include: Cantoro Italian Market Trattoria, Air Margaritaville, Detroit Street Café featuring Zingerman’s Coffee, and Atwater Brewery. (Photos courtesy of Detroit Metro Airport)


Posted by The Huron Hub Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Three restaurants recently opened for business in Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport’s (DTW) North Terminal. The restaurants include: Cantoro Italian Market Trattoria, a local, family owned and operated Italian market crossed with a modern corner store; Air Margaritaville, Jimmy Buffett’s airport restaurant with a local twist, Detroit Street Café featuring Zingerman’s Coffee; and Atwater Brewery, a Detroit favorite, that debuted downtown in 1997 with the mission to bring German brew-styles to the area.

The restaurants are the first of a phased dining redevelopment project to open. Cantoro Italian Market Trattoria opened on April 18 and is located pre-security in baggage claim. Atwater Brewery opened on June 1 and Air Margaritaville & Detroit Street Café featuring Zingerman’s Coffee opened on June 5.

“It is an exciting time at Detroit Metropolitan Airport,” said Wayne County Airport Authority CEO Chad Newton. “Our employees and customers have been looking forward to the redevelopment of our North Terminal dining options. We are happy to work in collaboration with our concessionaires to offer a taste of our region to all who walk through our terminal.”

The nearly $21 million transformation includes 15 food and beverage concepts, many of them Metro Detroit favorites. The restaurants will be operated by four concessionaires (HMSHost; DTW North Partners, LLC; NAC-MAC Concessions, LLC and McDonald’s USA) who exceeded the Airport Authority’s requirements for partnering with ACDBEs – Airport Concessions Disadvantaged Business Enterprises. The ACDBEs for the North Terminal food and beverage program are: AP United, LLC; AJA & Associates, LLC; Ellis Infinity, LLC; Jamjomar VIII, LLC; Rodriquez Group, LLC and W & W Diversified Services, Inc.

“HMSHost and our partners, AJA & Associates and Ellis Infinity, are thrilled to work with the Wayne County Airport Authority to bring Cantoro Italian Market to Detroit Metropolitan Airport,” said HMSHost Vice President of Business Development Kent Vanden Oever. “Not only does Cantoro bring a sense of Detroit into the airport, it brings the best of a long-standing Italian corner store and family restaurant with a modern twist for people to enjoy in the airport’s pre-security area.”

“When people fly into DTW, our airport is their first glimpse of who we are as a state, region and cities,” said Paradies Lagardere Dining Division Partner Tanya Allen. “Paradies Lagardere Dining Division takes this very seriously. We have great local and national concepts. Air Margaritaville Detroit is the third airport Margaritaville in the country. Zingerman’s Coffee is uniquely included within that location. Atwater Brewery is a Detroit favorite and sure to capture a loyal following. 2019 is going to be an exceptionally good year for traveling at DTW’s North Terminal.”

To ensure a variety of food options will be available at all times for customers, the transformation is divided into four phases. The second phase, which includes MOD Pizza, National Coney Island, and Starbucks is expected to be completed this summer.

Source: Detroit Metro Airport


 

Is it a tick? This guide will help you decide


By Scott Bolthouse | The Huron Hub
ScottBolthouse@HuronHub.com
Posted Monday, June 10, 2019

Huron Township is a rural community.

That means residents here get their fair share of tick encounters every spring and summer.

This season, tick populations are on the rise, according to reports.

Some who haven’t experienced these blood sucking arachnids may not know how to identify them.

Here is a helpful guide from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services that helps you identify a certain tick:

Ticks are closely related to insects and spiders, and there are over 20 known tick species in Michigan.

They usually live out their lives feeding on wildlife, however people may be bitten when they work or recreate in areas where ticks live.

Ticks are most often associated with natural areas such as grassy shorelines, wooded areas, or fields near wooded areas. Ticks are rarely encountered indoors unless brought inside on the clothing of people or on the body of a pet.

Several species of ticks are known to bite people and pets, and may harbor dangerous bacteria, viruses, or parasites.

Not all ticks carry diseases, but tick-borne diseases do occur in Michigan, and can be serious or fatal if not properly diagnosed and treated.

For more information about ticks and your health, visit this website.


 

Rep. Camilleri on legislation to protect LGBTQ communities from discrimination


Posted by The Huron Hub on Tuesday, June 4, 2019

LANSING — Today, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer partnered with legislators in the state House and Senate to unveil a plan to expand the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act by adding sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes. The bills introduced would protect LGBTQ individuals from discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations and more. In response, state Rep. Darrin Camilleri (D-Brownstown Township) issued the following statement:

“Too many of our neighbors, family and friends are forced to suffer from discrimination solely for who they are and who they love. This legislation puts practical protections in place to ensure everyone in the LGBTQ community feels safe and welcome in our state. As an ally to the LGBTQ community, I will always work to uplift and defend the voices of our neighbors, and I stand in solidarity with my colleagues as we fight for justice and equal treatment for all.”

Source: Rep. Darrin Camilleri


Community groups hosting Memorial Day ceremony downtown on May 26


Posted by The Huron Hub May 23, 2019 — 8:30 a.m. EST
Post updated May 23, 2019 — 12:15 p.m.

The Huron Township Rotary, American Legion and Historical Commission are hosting a Memorial Day ceremony at the Veteran’s Memorial in downtown New Boston On May 26.

The public is invited to attend the ceremony, which begins at 1 p.m.

Refreshments will be served after the ceremony.


Ford to cut 7,000 white-collar jobs during restructuring

(Photo/Ford Motor Co.)

  • In the U.S. about 2,300 jobs will be cut through buyouts and layoffs

  • About 1,500 have left voluntarily or with buyouts, while another 300 have already been laid off

  • About 500 workers will be let go starting this week, largely in and around the company’s headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. 


From the Associated Press newswire
Published May 20, 2019 — 1:00 p.m. EST

Ford revealed details of its long-awaited restructuring plan Monday as it prepared for a future of electric and autonomous vehicles by parting ways with 7,000 white-collar workers worldwide, about 10% of its global salaried workforce, the Associated Press is reporting.

The major revamp, which had been under way since last year, will save about $600 million per year by eliminating bureaucracy and increasing the number of workers reporting to each manager.

In the U.S. about 2,300 jobs will be cut through buyouts and layoffs. About 1,500 have left voluntarily or with buyouts, while another 300 have already been laid off. About 500 workers will be let go starting this week, largely in and around the company’s headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, just outside Detroit.

“To succeed in our competitive industry, and position Ford to win in a fast-charging future, we must reduce bureaucracy, empower managers, speed decision making and focus on the most valuable work, and cost cuts,” Hackett’s wrote.

It’s the second set of layoffs for Detroit-area automakers, even though the companies are making healthy profits. Sales in the U.S., where the automakers get most of their revenue, have fallen slightly but still are strong.

In November, General Motors announced it would shed up to 14,000 workers as it cut expenses to prepare for a shift to electric and autonomous vehicles. The layoffs included closure of five factories in the U.S. and Canada and cuts of another 8,000 white-collar workers worldwide. About 6,000 blue-collar positions were cut, but most of laid-off factory workers in the U.S. will be placed at other plants mainly that build trucks and SUVs.

Both companies have said the cuts are needed because the companies face huge capital expenditures to update their current vehicles and develop them for the future.

At GM, the cuts brought withering criticism from President Donald Trump and Congress, especially the closing of a small-car factory in Lordstown, Ohio. Trump campaigned on bringing factory jobs back to the industrial Midwest. GM has since announced a possible deal to sell the Lordstown plant to a startup electric vehicle maker, but it hasn’t been finalized.

Ford’s white-collar employees had been fearful since last July when the company said the restructuring would cost $7 billion in cash and hit pretax earnings by $11 billion over the next three to five years. Many have been upset that it took so long for the company to make decisions.

Factory workers have not been affected by the restructuring thus far, as the company has retooled car plants so they can build more popular trucks and SUVs.

The layoffs, while large, weren’t as bad as many had expected. Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas predicted 25,000 white-collar job cuts late last year, a number that Ford would not deny.

Hackett said in the memo that Ford is departing from past practices and letting laid-off employees stay a few days to wrap up their jobs and say good-bye to colleagues. In the past, laid-off workers would have had to pack up and leave immediately.

“Ford is a family company and saying goodbye to colleagues is difficult and emotional,” Hackett wrote.

Hackett told workers that under the restructuring, managers now will have seven people reporting to them on average, up from five before changes were initiated began. That reduces management bureaucracy by one-third from before the “Smart Redesign” began.

Before the restructuring, Ford had 14 organizational layers, but that will drop to nine or less by the end of the year, Hackett’s memo said.


 

Residents reminded to avoid foam on lakes and rivers with high levels of PFAS

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is reminding residents to avoid foam on Michigan lakes and rivers known to have per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the water. The Huron River, seen here, that runs through Huron Township and Downriver, has been identified as a water body that has PFAS. (Photo by Scott Bolthouse — The Huron Hub)


Posted on The Huron Hub on May 19, 2019 — 1:00 p.m. EST

As the summer recreation season is drawing closer, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is issuing a reminder that everyone should avoid foam on Michigan lakes and rivers known to have per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the water. Foam on these water bodies can have much higher amounts of PFAS than the water, and swallowing foam with PFAS could be a health risk.

Health advisories for foam exist on these waterbodies:

-Van Etten Lake, Oscoda.

-Lake Margrethe, Grayling.

-Rogue River, Rockford.

-Thornapple River, Grand Rapids.

-Huron River, Southeast Michigan.

Swimming or bathing in water containing PFAS is not a health concern because the amount of PFAS is typically low compared to the foam. Although swallowing PFAS is the main way to get it in your body, an accidental swallow of river or lake water is not a health concern.

Related articles: 

The amount of PFAS in lake and river water and in foam matters in determining if a health concern exists. MDHHS will continue to evaluate surface water and foam data and will issue further recommendations if necessary.

PFAS-containing foam can have high amounts of PFAS. Although, current science indicates PFAS does not move easily through the skin, it’s best to rinse off foam after contact and bathe or shower after the day’s outdoor activities. None of this information changes recommendations for people’s water used at home.

An MDHHS evaluation of how young children might recreate on lakes and rivers shows a health risk could exist from repeated, prolonged whole-body contact with foam containing high amounts of PFAS. Repeated prolonged contact is considered to be three hours per day, five days per week, over three months of a year, representing a summer season. MDHHS’ recommendation to avoid foam with PFAS is protective of everyone, including young children.

Additionally, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development recommends that people not allow their animals – especially dogs – to come into contact with or swallow the foam. Dogs and other animals can potentially swallow foam collected in their fur when grooming themselves and should be thoroughly rinsed off with fresh water after contact with foamy water.

Not all foam contains PFAS. There is naturally occurring foam that piles up in bays, eddies or river barriers such as dams. This foam is off-white and/or brown in color and may have an earthy or fish smell.

PFAS foam:

-Can be bright white.

-Is usually lightweight.

-Can be sticky.

-Tends to pile up like shaving cream.

-Can blow onto the beach.

More information about PFAS and foam under the PFAS Foam section at Michigan.gov/pfasresponse.

Source: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services